angle-up angle-right angle-down angle-left close user menu open menu closed search globe bars phone store

Validity and Fairness of TOEIC® Score Interpretations

TOEIC® test design and development processes are systematic and rigorous, leading to score interpretations that are meaningful, fair and relevant to the real world.

Evidence: Research in this category examines:

  • whether scores mean what they are intended to mean
  • that TOEIC score interpretations about someone's English skills are unbiased and fair (e.g., in regard to gender or disability)
  • that they reflect a real-world setting ability
  • Cover of Validity: What Does It Mean for the TOEIC® Tests?

    Validity: What Does It Mean for the TOEIC® Tests?

    This paper provides a nontechnical overview of test development and research projects undertaken to ensure that TOEIC test scores serve as valid indicators of test takers' skills to communicate in English in global workplace environments.

    The main value of the TOEIC tests lies in their validity, which can be defined as the extent to which the tests do what we claim they can do.

    Read more about what validity means for the TOEIC tests

  • Cover of The Relationship Among TOEIC® Listening, Reading, Speaking and Writing Skills

    The Relationship Among TOEIC® Listening, Reading, Speaking and Writing Skills

    Through examination of test scores, this research found that the TOEIC tests measure distinct but related skills, and that, taken together, they provide a reasonably complete picture of English-language proficiency. This finding provides additional evidence that four-skill approach to language proficiency assessment is crucial.

    Read more about The Relationship Among TOEIC Listening, Reading, Speaking and Writing Skills

  • Cover of Measuring English-language workplace proficiency across subgroups: Using CFA (Confirmatory factor analysis) models to validate test score interpretation

    Measuring English-Language Workplace Proficiency across Subgroups: Using CFA models to Validate Test Score Interpretation

    This study used a statistical technique called "factor analysis" to determine which statistical model best explained performance on the TOEIC® Listening and Reading test. Researchers found that a model (two-factor model) in which reading and listening skills were represented as distinct abilities best accounted for performance, consistent with how scores are supposed to be interpreted.

    Read more about Measuring English-language workplace proficiency across subgroups

  • Linking TOEIC® Speaking Scores Using TOEIC® Listening Scores

    In testing programs, multiple forms of a test are used across different administrations to prevent overexposure of test forms and to reduce the possibility of test takers gaining advance knowledge of test content. Because slight differences may occur in the statistical difficulty of the alternate forms, a statistical procedure known as test score linking has been commonly used to adjust for these differences in difficulty so that test forms are comparable.

    Read more about Linking TOEIC® Speaking Scores Using TOEIC Listening Scores

  • Cover of Expanding the Question Formats of the TOEIC® Speaking Test

    Expanding the Question Formats of the TOEIC® Speaking Test

    Traditionally, researchers have used the term "authenticity" to refer to the degree to which tasks on a language test correspond to those used in the real world, with authenticity being a desired characteristic of tasks and tests. This white paper explains how the format of several questions in the TOEIC® Speaking test was expanded to include a greater variety of real-world situations.

    Read more about Expanding the Question Formats of the TOEIC Speaking Test

  • Analyzing Item Generation with Natural Language Processing Tools for the TOEIC® Listening Test

    The TOEIC® Listening test includes items or tasks related to the global workplace and with a variety of authentic contexts. As the need for an ever larger number of test forms has increased, an important goal for the TOEIC Listening test has been to increase the efficiency of item generations by maintaining a large pool of items across a wide range of contexts has been an important goal for the TOEIC Listening test.

    Read more about Analyzing Item Generation with Natural Language Processing Tools for the TOEIC Listening Test

  • Cover of The Incremental Contribution of TOEIC® Listening, Reading, Speaking and Writing Tests to Predicting Performance on Real-Life English-Language Tasks

    The Incremental Contribution of TOEIC® Listening, Reading, Speaking and Writing Tests to Predicting Performance on Real-Life English-Language Tasks

    This study investigated whether proficiency in a particular language skill (e.g., speaking) could be better estimated by considering not only the TOEIC test scores corresponding to that skill, but also TOEIC tests scores for other skills. The results supported this assertion, suggesting that scores on the four-skill TOEIC tests together provide a more valid measurement of English-language proficiency than any skill in isolation.

    Read more about The Incremental Contribution of TOEIC Listening, Reading, Speaking and Writing Tests to Predicting Performance on Real-Life English-Language Tasks

  • Cover of The TOEIC® Listening, Reading, Speaking and Writing Tests: Evaluating Their Unique Contribution to Assessing English-Language Proficiency

    The TOEIC® Listening, Reading, Speaking and Writing Tests: Evaluating Their Unique Contribution to Assessing English-Language Proficiency

    This study investigates:

    1. The extent to which TOEIC test scores of one ability correlate with test takers' self-assessments of their English abilities across all four skills
    2. Whether one English skill (e.g., reading) can be more accurately estimated or predicted using multiple other TOEIC test scores i.e., listening, speaking and writing

    Read more about Evaluating the Unique Contribution of TOEIC four skills to Assessing English-Language Proficiency

  • Cover of Constructed-Response (CR) Differential Item Functioning (DIF) Evaluations for TOEIC Speaking and Writing Tests

    Constructed-Response (CR) Differential Item Functioning (DIF) Evaluations for TOEIC Speaking and Writing Tests

    Differential item functioning (DIF) is a statistical procedure used to identify items or tasks that are unexpectedly biased in some way, inappropriately favoring one group of test takers over another. One of the challenges for speaking and writing tests is the lack of proven, practical DIF techniques that can be used to analyze performance-based or "constructed-response" tests.

    Read more about Constructed-Response (CR) Differential Item Functioning (DIF) Evaluations for TOEIC Speaking and Writing Tests

  • Cover of Comparison of Content, Item Statistics, and Test taker Performance on the Redesigned and Classic TOEIC Listening and Reading Test

    Comparison of Content, Item Statistics, and Test Taker Performance on the Redesigned and Classic TOEIC® Listening and Reading Test

    This paper compares the content, reliability and difficulty of the classic and 2006 redesigned TOEIC® Listening and Reading tests. Although the redesigned tests included slightly different item (question) types to better reflect current models of language proficiency, the tests were judged to be similar across versions.

    Read more about Comparison of Content, Item Statistics, and Test taker Performance on the Redesigned and Classic TOEIC Listening and Reading Test

  • Cover of Evidence-Centered Design: The TOEIC Speaking and Writing Tests

    Evidence-Centered Design: The TOEIC® Speaking and Writing Tests

    Evidence-Centered Design (ECD) is an assessment development methodology which explicitly clarifies what an assessment measures and supports skills interpretations based on test scores. This paper describes the ECD processes used to develop the TOEIC® Speaking and Writing tests. Evidence collected through the test design process produced foundational support for the validity of TOEIC Speaking and Writing test score interpretations.

    Read more about Evidence-Centered Design: The TOEIC Speaking and Writing Tests

  • Cover of Statistical Analyses for the TOEIC Speaking and Writing Pilot Study

    Statistical Analyses for the TOEIC® Speaking and Writing Pilot Study

    This paper reports the results of a pilot study that contributed to TOEIC Speaking and Writing test development. The analysis of the reliability of test scores found evidence of several types of score consistency, including inter-rater reliability (agreement of several raters on a score) and internal consistency (a measure based on correlation between items on the same test).

    Read more about Statistical Analyses for the TOEIC Speaking and Writing pilot study

  • Statistical Analyses for the Updated TOEIC® Listening and Reading Test

    To ensure that tests continue to meet the needs of test takers and score users, it is important that testing programs periodically revisit their assessments. For this reason, in order to keep up with the continuously changing use of English and the ways in which individuals commonly communicate in the global workplace and everyday life, an updated TOEIC Listening and Reading test was designed and first launched in May 2016.

    Read more Statistical Analyses for the Updated TOEIC Listening and Reading Test

  • Cover of The Redesigned TOEIC Listening and Reading Test: Relations to Test Taker Perceptions of Proficiency in English

    The Redesigned TOEIC® Listening and Reading Test: Relations to Test Taker Perceptions of Proficiency in English

    After any test redesign project — such as the redesign of the TOEIC Listening and Reading test in 2006 — it is important to provide evidence that test scores can still be meaningfully interpreted. This study examined the relationship between scores on the redesign of the TOEIC Listening and Reading test and test takers' perceptions of their own English proficiency. Researchers found moderate correlations between the test scores and test takers' perceptions, providing evidence that scores on the redesigned TOEIC Listening and Reading tests are meaningful indicators of English ability.

    Read more about The Redesigned TOEIC Listening and Reading Test: Relations to Test Taker Perceptions of Proficiency in English

  • Cover of TOEIC Bridge™ Scores: Validity Evidence from Korea and Japan

    TOEIC Bridge Scores: Validity Evidence from Korea and Japan

    This study sought to compare TOEIC Bridge scores to test takers' self-evaluations of their own abilities to perform everyday language tasks in English. The results suggest that the test scores correlated well with test takers' self-evaluations, providing further evidence in support of the of TOEIC Bridge scores as valid and fair indicators of English-language proficiency.

    Read more about TOEIC Bridge Scores: Validity Evidence from Korea and Japan

  • Cover of The Relationships of test scores measured by the TOEIC® Listening and Reading Test and TOEIC® Speaking and Writing Test

    The Relationships of Test Scores Measured by the TOEIC® Listening and Reading Test and TOEIC® Speaking and Writing Test

    This study examines the relationship between TOEIC Listening and Reading scores and TOEIC Speaking and Writing scores in order to determine whether or not Listening and Reading scores should be used as predictors of Speaking and Writing scores, and vice versa. Findings support the validity of test scores for the measured skills (e.g., Listening and Reading test scores provide meaningful interpretations of Listening and Reading skills).

    Read more about The Relationships of test scores measured by the TOEIC® Listening and Reading Test and TOEIC Speaking and Writing Test

  • Cover of TOEIC Speaking and Writing Tests: Relations to Test taker Perceptions of Proficiency in English

    The TOEIC® Speaking and Writing Tests: Relations to Test Taker Perceptions of Proficiency in English

    This study sought to compare scores on the TOEIC Speaking and Writing tests to students' self-evaluations of their abilities to perform everyday English-language tasks. The researchers reported relatively strong correlations between test scores and the self-evaluations. This finding contributes further evidence in support of TOEIC Speaking and Writing test scores as indicators of English-language proficiency. This study was also published as Powers, Kim, Weng, and Van Winkle (2009).

    Read more about TOEIC Speaking and Writing Tests: Relationships to Test Taker Perceptions of Proficiency in English

  • Cover of TOEIC® Listening and Reading Test Scale Anchoring Study

    TOEIC® Listening and Reading Test Scale Anchoring Study

    Scale anchoring is a process that groups test scores into score ranges or proficiency levels. It uses a combination of statistical methods and expert judgment to produce descriptions of the skills and knowledge typically exhibited by test takers at each proficiency level. This research report describes the scale anchoring process for TOEIC Listening and Reading tests, which facilitates meaningful score interpretations.

    Read more about TOEIC Listening and Reading Test Scale Anchoring Study

  • Background and Goals of the TOEIC® Listening and Reading Test Update Project

    This report describes the goals and outcomes of a project to update the TOEIC Listening and Reading test in 2016. The use of English for communication, particularly in international workplace contexts, is continually evolving. Therefore, the TOEIC Listening and Reading test is reexamined periodically to ensure that the test content reflects current communication in the workplace and in daily life, thereby supporting meaningful interpretations about English-language skills and promoting a positive impact on English teaching and learning.

    Read more about Background and Goals of the TOEIC Listening and Reading Test Update Project

  • Cover of Background and Goals of the TOEIC Listening and Reading Test Redesign Project

    Background and Goals of the TOEIC® Listening and Reading Test Redesign Project

    As time progresses, it becomes important to revisit the design of a test to ensure that its conceptualization of language proficiency aligns with current theory and test tasks continue to be indicative of real-world tasks. This report outlines the goals, theoretical alignment, procedures and outcomes of a redesign effort for the TOEIC Listening and Reading test in 2006.

    Read more about the Background and Goals of the TOEIC Listening and Reading Test Redesign Project

  • Cover of Field Study Results for the Redesigned TOEIC Listening and Reading Test

    Field Study Results for the Redesigned TOEIC® Listening and Reading Test

    This paper describes the results of a field study for the 2006 redesigned TOEIC Listening and Reading tests, which includes analyses of item and test difficulty, reliability and correlations between test sections with classic TOEIC Listening and Reading tests.

    Read more about Field Study Results for the Redesigned TOEIC Listening and Reading Test

  • Cover of Validating TOEIC Bridge™ Scores Against Teacher Ratings for Vocational Students in China

    Validating TOEIC Bridge Scores Against Teacher Ratings for Vocational Students in China

    This study compared TOEIC Bridge scores with teachers' assessments of test takers' abilities to perform everyday language tasks in English. The authors reported moderate correlations between these assessments and test scores, which provide supporting evidence of the validity of TOEIC Bridge test scores as indicators of English-language proficiency.

    Read more about Validating TOEIC Bridge Scores Against Teacher Ratings for Vocational Students in China

  • Cover of Validating TOEIC Bridge™ Scores Against Teacher and Student Ratings: A Small-Scale Study

    Validating TOEIC Bridge Scores Against Teacher and Student Ratings: A Small-Scale Study

    This study sought to assess the degree to which TOEIC Bridge scores correspond to student self-assessments and teacher assessments of students, two measurements of English-language proficiency. TOEIC Bridge scores were found to be moderately correlated with these measurements, a finding which provides validity evidence that TOEIC Bridge scores can be meaningfully interpreted as indicators of English-language proficiency.

    Read more about Validating TOEIC Bridge Scores Against Teacher and Student Ratings

  • Cover of Relating Scores on the TOEIC Bridge™ Test to Student Perceptions of Proficiency in English

    Relating Scores on the TOEIC Bridge Test to Student Perceptions of Proficiency in English

    This study investigated the relationship between TOEIC Bridge scores and students' evaluations of their own English-language proficiency. The TOEIC Bridge test scores were found to be correlated with self-reported reading and listening skills, providing evidence that TOEIC Bridge test scores are valid or meaningful indicators of English-language reading and listening proficiency.

    Read more about Relating Scores on the TOEIC Bridge Test to Student Perceptions of Proficiency in English