Kite Flight

On-screen: [Picture of the book Kite Flight. A depiction of the students is above this.]

Speaker: Teacher - You all have done a good job reading the story “Kite Flight.” And, now I want us to think more carefully about Bindi’s personality—about what she is like as a person. This discussion will give you the chance to think about your classmates’ ideas and help you to develop and support your own ideas based on things that happened in the story. So, what words would you use to describe Bindi? Who would like to start?

Speaker: Teacher - Ava.

Speaker: Ava, Student - I would say that Bindi is nice.

Speaker: Teacher – Hmmm, and what makes you say that Bindi is nice?

Speaker: Ava, Student - Well, she stops to help Jack when she sees that he’s by himself.

Speaker: Teacher - OK, can you underline where you saw that in the text?

On-screen: [Picture of the book Kite Flight. A depiction of the students is above this. Ava underlines ‘but she stopped her bike and climbed off’.]

Speaker: Ava, Student - Yes. Let me find it. It’s right here.

On-screen: [Written and circled on a whiteboard: ‘Bindi’; ‘nice’. A depiction of the students is above this.]

Speaker: Teacher - OK, good job! Let’s write that on the board. I’m going to make a web so we can write down all of our ideas that you’re sharing. OK, I’m going to put Bindi’s name here in the middle. I’m going to put a circle around her. And we’ll write that she is nice. OK, and how does that spot show you that Bindi is nice, Ava?

Speaker: Ava, Student - Well, she could’ve just kept going to see the rest of her friends, but she stopped to help him instead.

Speaker: Teacher – And do you think she really wanted to go see her friends?

Speaker: Ava, Student - Yeah, I do.

Speaker: Teacher - What makes you think that?

Speaker: Ava, Student - Because it said that she was trying hard to get there to see her friends.

Speaker: Teacher - And, where did it say that?

Speaker: Ava, Student - Um, it said she really wanted to get there… Here it is.

On-screen: [Picture of the book Kite Flight. A depiction of the students is above this. Ava underlines ‘Bindi pumped her legs as hard as she could. She knew that her friends were waiting!’]

Speaker: Teacher - Excellent, OK, so we have one word so far that describes Bindi…and it’s “nice.” Does anyone else have a word that they think describes Bindi’s personality?

Speaker: Teacher - Neel.

Speaker: Neel, Student - I would say that Bindi is smart!

Speaker: Teacher - She’s smart! OK, so let’s add that to our web. OK, what makes you think that she’s smart, Neel?

On-screen: [Written and circled on a whiteboard: ‘Bindi’; ‘nice’; ‘smart’. A depiction of the students is above this.]

Speaker: Neel, Student - Well, Bindi gets the kite to fly.

Speaker: Teacher – But wasn’t Jack the one who was holding it when the kite flew?

Speaker: Neel, Student - Yes, he was, but it was Bindi’s idea.

Speaker: Teacher - OK, and what idea do you think Neel is talking about, Lily?

Speaker: Lily, Student - Oh, it’s the idea that she had to have Jack ride his bike and fly it.

Speaker: Teacher - Is that the one, Neel?

Speaker: Neel, Student - Yea.

Speaker: Teacher - Can you show me where that was in the story, Neel?

Speaker: Neel, Student - Yes, I think so. It’s um … oh, here it is.

On-screen: [Picture of the book Kite Flight. A depiction of the students is above this. Neel underlines “I think I have an idea!” she says. “Maybe we’re just not fast enough.”]

Speaker: Teacher - So, how does that sentence that you underlined show that she is smart?

Speaker: Neel, Student - Well, she figured out an idea that worked when she watched other things in the park flying in the air.

Speaker: Teacher - OK, OK, and how did you know that her idea worked? Let’s see, can you ask a friend to help you to show how we could know that her idea worked?

Speaker: Neel, Student - I pick Mateo.

Speaker: Mateo, Student - Well, let’s see. I think that I knew it worked because I saw the kite flying.

Speaker: Teacher - Where did you see that?

Speaker: Mateo, Student - Well, I saw it right…oh! Right here.

On-screen: [Picture of the book Kite Flight. A depiction of the students is above this. Mateo circles the picture of Bindi on her bike holding a kite.]

Speaker: Teacher - That makes sense! Good thinking! OK, so did anyone else see anything else on that page that helped you know that Bindi’s idea worked?

Speaker: Teacher - How about Ben?

Speaker: Ben, Student - Yeah, I knew the idea worked from the words on that page.

Speaker: Teacher - OK, and can you show me which words you’re talking about? 

Speaker: Ben, Student - Yeah, they’re right here.

On-screen: [Picture of the book Kite Flight. A depiction of the students is above this. Ben underlines ‘the kite took off’!]

Speaker: Teacher - Great! Thank you! OK, so far, we have Ava’s idea that Bindi is nice and Neel’s idea that Bindi is smart. So, Lily, how about you? What word would you use to describe Bindi?

Speaker: Lily, Student - Well, I would say that Bindi was being rude.

Speaker: Teacher - Really? And, what makes you say that?

Speaker: Lily, Student - She doesn’t even go over to her friends when they’re waving to her to come over.

Speaker: Teacher - Interesting…what did you think about that?

Speaker: Lily, Student - That wasn’t nice because they were waiting for her.

Speaker: Teacher - OK, Ava, you talked about this same part of the story for a little bit. And, what word did you use to describe Bindi and how she didn’t go over to her friends right away?

Speaker: Ava, Student - Oh, I thought that she was being nice.

Speaker: Teacher - So, Lily, that sounds different from what you’re thinking. Right? How about if you and Ava talk about why she didn’t go over to her friends right away?

Speaker: Lily, Student - Well, she didn’t go over right away because she stopped to see Jack.

Speaker: Ava, Student - Yeah, she stopped to help him.

Speaker: Lily, Student - Uh huh.

Speaker: Ava, Student - She thought Jack needed help. That’s why she stopped. If she had just kept going and didn’t stop to help him, then that would have been rude.

Speaker: Lily, Student - Oh yeah, I wasn’t thinking about it that way. I was just thinking about her friends.

Speaker: Teacher - Right, and did she ever go over to her friends?

Speaker: Lily, Student - Yea, I think that at the end of the story it looked like she was going to go over to her friends.

Speaker: Teacher - OK, so do you still think Bindi was being rude, Lily? Should I add that to our web?

Speaker: Lily, Student - No, no, no. I don’t think you should put it.

Speaker: Teacher - OK, what could be an idea to describe Bindi, Lily, that is opposite of “rude” and that we could put on our web?

Speaker: Lily, Student - Well, maybe you could say that she was being a good friend to Jack.

On-screen: [Written and circled on a whiteboard: ‘Bindi’; ‘nice’; ‘smart’; ‘good friend’. A depiction of the students is above this.]

Speaker: Teacher - Oh, OK, good. Let’s add that idea. Let’s add “good friend.” OK, and thank you, Lily. Who else has a word that they think describes Bindi?

Speaker: Teacher - How about Mateo.

Speaker: Mateo, Student - Well, I would say that Bindi is creative.

Speaker: Teacher - Creative, OK. Let’s write “creative.” And, what do you mean by creative?

On-screen: [Written and circled on a whiteboard: ‘Bindi’; ‘nice’; ‘smart’; ‘good friend’; ‘creative’. A depiction of the students is above this.]

Speaker: Mateo, Student - She comes up with different ideas.

Speaker: Teacher - What ideas did she have?

Speaker: Mateo, Student - In the story, she tries flying the kite first.

Speaker: Teacher - I remember that. OK, where did that happen?

Speaker: Mateo, Student - Um … I saw it right here.

On-screen: [Picture of the book Kite Flight. A depiction of the students is above this. Mateo circles the picture in book of Bindi running with a kite.]

Speaker: Teacher - Yes, OK. So you said that she is creative because she came up with different ideas. So, what was another idea that Bindi had, Mateo?

Speaker: Mateo, Student - Well, then she had them both try flying the kite.

Speaker: Teacher - Did that work?

Speaker: Mateo, Student - No.

Speaker: Teacher - No. OK, what did she do then?

Speaker: Mateo, Student - Well then she came up with the idea about using the bike.

Speaker: Teacher - Oh, OK. Let’s see, Neel, you talked about that idea as the reason that Bindi is smart, and I am hearing you say, Mateo, that she is creative from that same part of the story. So, Neel, do you think that Bindi can be both smart and creative because she got the kite to fly?

Speaker: Neel, Student - Yeah, I think so.

Speaker: Teacher - OK, and Mateo, do you agree?

Speaker: Mateo, Student - Yeah.

Speaker: Teacher - Why?

Speaker: Mateo, Student - Well, because her last idea was really smart.  

Speaker: Teacher - OK. We have lots of ideas up here on our web, right? So Ben, what about you? How would you describe Bindi?

Speaker: Ben, Student - I think she doesn’t give up.

Speaker: Teacher - OK, doesn’t give up. Let’s write that. Doesn’t give up. Alright. OK. And,what makes you say that?

On-screen: [Written and circled on a whiteboard: ‘Bindi’; ‘nice’; ‘smart’; ‘good friend’; ‘creative’; ‘doesn’t give up’. A depiction of the students is above this.]

Speaker: Ben, Student - She doesn’t get the kite to fly right away, so she just keeps trying different ideas.

Speaker: Teacher - Right! Does that sound like something someone else said earlier?

Speaker: Ben, Student - Well, oh, Mateo! He was just talking about how Bindi had different ideas.

Speaker: Teacher - Excellent, right! And Mateo, do you agree with Ben about his idea that Bindi doesn’t give up?

Speaker: Mateo, Student - Yes.

Speaker: Teacher - OK, so, Ben, what could she have done instead…if she hadn’t tried different ideas like you said?

Speaker: Ben, Student - Well, she could have just given up.

Speaker: Teacher - Oh, and what do you think Jack would have done if she did that?

Speaker: Ben, Student - I think he would have maybe just gone home.

Speaker: Teacher - You might be right. How many different ideas did she try?

Speaker: Ben, Student - Um, I’m not…I’m not sure.

Speaker: Teacher – Hmm. OK, let’s think about it. Why don’t we go back to our story, and what did she try first?

On-screen: [Picture of the book Kite Flight. A depiction of the students is above this. The circled picture in book of Bindi running with a kite.]

Speaker: Ben, Student - Um, let’s see…OK, first she tried flying the kite herself.

Speaker: Teacher - She tried flying the kite herself which is right there. Let’s scroll down and see what’s next. And, then what?

On-screen: [Picture of the book Kite Flight. A depiction of the students is above this. Picture of Jack and Bindi trying to fly the kite together.]

Speaker: Ben, Student - Then she said they should try together.

Speaker: Teacher - OK, and then let’s scroll one more and see. OK, and then what?

On-screen: [Picture of the book Kite Flight. A depiction of the students is above this. A picture of Bindi on a bike with kite.]

Speaker: Ben, Student - Then she had the idea about the bike.

Speaker: Teacher - Right. So how many ideas is that?

Speaker: Ben, Student - That’s 3 ideas.

Speaker: Teacher - I see what you mean about her never giving up! Does everyone agree with Ben’s idea that Bindi doesn’t give up?

Everyone: Yes.

On-screen: [Written and circled on a whiteboard: ‘Bindi’; ‘nice’; ‘smart’; ‘good friend’; ‘creative’; ‘doesn’t give up’. A depiction of the students is above this.]

Speaker: Teacher - Great! So, today we discussed words that describe Bindi’s personality and shared places in the story that made us think that our ideas are correct. Let’s see. Ava and Lily think that she is nice and a good friend because she helped Jack. And, Neel and Mateo think that she is smart and creative because she came up with a good way to make the kite fly. And, Ben, you thought she doesn’t give up because she kept trying different ideas. All of you used words and pictures from the story to support your ideas. Good job today! Thank you, everyone.

End of Kite Flight video.

Video duration: 12:17