New Careers in Nursing

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's (RWJF) New Careers in Nursing (NCIN) scholarship program is a national program of RWJF and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN). The NCIN program is designed to help alleviate the national nursing shortage, increase the diversity of nursing professionals, expand capacity in baccalaureate and graduate nursing programs, and enhance the pipeline of potential nurse faculty.

Through grants to schools of nursing, NCIN provided $10,000 scholarships to students. Recipients had the flexibility to use the scholarships to pay for tuition, academic fees, or living expenses. The NCIN program served college graduates without nursing degrees who are enrolled in accelerated bachelor's of science in nursing (ABSN) or accelerated master's of science in nursing (AMSN) programs and who are from groups underrepresented in nursing (i.e., minorities and men) or from economically disadvantaged backgrounds.¹

Started in 2008 and currently in its final years of programming, the legacy of the NCIN program remains in the critical support that it provided for accelerated nursing students from underrepresented and disadvantaged backgrounds and the opportunities that it provided for schools of nursing to learn more about how to support traditionally underrepresented students.

Educational Testing Services (ETS) conducted the external evaluation of the NCIN program from 2009 to 2015. Phase II of the evaluation had three primary foci: (1) the post ABSN or AMSN experiences of NCIN scholars, (2) the experiences of faculty and students in the teaching and learning components of the ABSN or AMSN programs and (3) the changes in nursing school culture as a result of the NCIN program implementation.

Additional information can be found at:

 

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New Careers in Nursing Scholar Alumni: Options in the Early Career Years
By: Catherine M. Millett, Leslie M. Stickler, & Haijiang Wang
ETS Research Report No. RR-15-28

The New Careers in Nursing (NCIN) Alumni Study was designed to advance knowledge in the field of nursing education by looking at post-degree experiences of NCIN scholarship recipients, such as employment and graduate degree attainment. The NCIN Alumni Study also focused on the reflections of NCIN Scholars who have graduated and moved into the field on their satisfaction with various aspects of NCIN and their academic programs, as well as on how these programmatic aspects have influenced their post-degree experiences.

Read the Executive Summary
New Careers in Nursing Alumni Survey
Top Line Data (Excel)

 

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Accelerated Nursing Degree Programs: Insights Into Teaching and Learning Experiences 
By: Catherine M. Millett, Leslie M. Stickler, & Haijiang Wang
ETS Research Report No. RR-15-29

The Accelerated Nursing Degree Programs: Insights Into Teaching and Learning Experiences report explores how nurse educators are adapting their teaching practices for accelerated, second-degree nursing program students. To provide findings on topics including instructional practices and the roles and attitudes of faculty, a web survey was administered to almost 100 staff members from schools of nursing that received grant and scholarship funds through the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's New Careers in Nursing (NCIN) program for accelerated nursing students. The study revealed that nursing school faculty have positive perceptions of working with accelerated nursing students and that instructional approaches do not differ much between traditional and accelerated nursing students. At the same time, the factors described as most predictive of accelerated nursing student success were noncognitive attributes such as motivation and commitment to the nursing profession; prior degrees in the science or health fields were not necessarily seen as predictive of the success of second-degree students working toward an accelerated bachelor's or master's degree in nursing.

Read the Executive Summary
Survey of Teaching & Learning in Accelerated Nursing Programs
Top Line Data (Excel)

 

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A Study of the Influence of the New Careers in Nursing Program on the Culture of Participating Schools of Nursing
By: Catherine M. Millett & Marisol J.C. Kevelson
ETS Research Report No. RR-15-30

In 2014, ETS conducted a study investigating how the New Careers in Nursing (NCIN) program may have influenced the culture of participating schools of nursing. Case studies involving multiple interviews and focus groups were conducted in eight NCIN schools of nursing chosen to represent public and private schools from all U.S. regions. Results revealed that, in addition to benefitting accelerated nursing program students through the financial support of scholarships, the NCIN program may have increased the enrollment of male and minority students in accelerated nursing programs. Furthermore, the orientation, mentoring, and leadership supports provided with NCIN resources may have improved program and career outcomes for participating students, and in many cases the supports will be extended to all nursing students after the end of NCIN. Lessons learned for the field include the potential for schools of nursing to increase the diversity of their incoming cohorts and the ongoing need for financial supports for accelerated nursing students.

Read the Executive Summary

(1) The eligibility requirements for the NCIN program include membership in a group that is underrepresented in nursing or a disadvantaged background (e.g., economically disadvantaged), U.S. citizenship or permanent residency, a baccalaureate degree in a non-nursing discipline, and acceptance into an entry-level accelerated nursing degree program for non-nursing college graduates.